Universal Access To All Knowledge
Home Donate | Store | Blog | FAQ | Jobs | Volunteer Positions | Contact | Bios | Forums | Projects | Terms, Privacy, & Copyright
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
Search Results
Results: 1 through 50 of 303 (0.003 secs)
You searched for: subject:"What -- Voyager 1"
[1] 2 3 4 5 6 7     Next    Last
[image]Cloud Layers East of the Great Red Spot - NASA
This color view of the region just to the East of the Great Red Spot was taken by Voyager 1 on March 4, 1979 at a distance of 1,000,000 miles (1,800,000 km). Differences in cloud color may indicate relative heights of the cloud layers but the exact relationship between color and height has not yet been established. The smallest clouds seen in this picture are approximately 20 miles (30 km) across.
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 7
[image]Cloud Layers Southeast of the Great Red Spot - NASA
This view of the region just to the Southeast of the Great Red Spot was taken by Voyager 1 on March 4, 1979 at a distance of 1,100,000 miles (1,800,000 km). Differences in cloud color may indicate relative heights of the cloud layers but the exact relationship between color and height has not yet been established. The smallest clouds seen in this picture are approximately 20 miles (30 km) across.
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 7
[image]Global Mercator Mosaic - NASA
Io's volcanic plains are shown in this Voyager 1 image mosaic which covers the area roughly from latitude 60 degrees N. to latitude 60 degrees S. and longitude 100-345. North is up. Numerous volcanic calderas, lava flows, and volcanic eruption plumes are visible here. The composition of Io's volcanic plains and lava flows has not been determined, but they could consist dominantly of sulfur with surface frosts of sulfur dioxide or of silicates (such as basalt) encrusted with sulfur and sulfur dio...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 8
[image]High Winds in the Jovian Mid-latitudes - NASA
A high resolution image of the Jovian mid-latitudes taken by Voyager 1 on March 2, 1979, shows distinctly differing characteristics of the planet's meteorology. The well defined pale orange line running from southwest to northeast (North is at the top) marks the high speed north temperate current with wind speeds of about 120 meters per second. These high winds produce a cleaner flow pattern in the surrounding clouds...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 8
[movies]The Postponement of Mission STS-133 tops the billboard on This Week @ NASA
Also, EPOXI meets a Comet, NASA and LEGO build a future together, Administrator Bolden heralds ten years of ISS, KSC Tweetsup, Sonic Booms, and Remembering Voyager 1.
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 25
[image]Jupiter's Great Red Spot Region - NASA
This mosaic of the Great Red Spot shows that the region has changed significantly since the Voyager 1 encounter three months ago. Around the northern boundary a white cloud is seen, which extends to east of the region. The presence of this cloud prevents small cloud vertices from circling the spot in the manner seen in the Voyager 1 encounter. Another white oval cloud (different from the one present in this position three months ago) is seen south of the Great Red Spot...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 19
[image]Io - Volcano Loki and Loki Patera - NASA
The detailed structure near the volcano Loki is like nothing seen elsewhere on Io. When this Voyager 1 picture was taken, the main eruptive activity came from the lower left of the dark linear feature (perhaps a rift) in the center. Below is the "lava lake", a U-shaped dark area about 200 kilometers across. In this specially processed image, detail can be seen in the dark surface of this feature, possibly due to "icebergs" of solid sulfur in a liquid sulfur lake...
Keywords: What -- Io; What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 33
[image]Concentric Rings Surrounding Valhalla - NASA
The concentric rings surrounding Valhalla are perhaps the most distinctive geological feature on Callisto. This Voyager 1 close-up shows a segment of the ridged terrain. The presence of superimpact craters shows that the rings formed early in Callisto's history; however, the density of craters is less here than on other parts of the satellite, where the surface is older.
Keywords: What -- Callisto; What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 7
[image]Volcanic Plains of Io Near Galai Patera - NASA
Io's volcanic plains are shown in this Voyager 1 image, which spans an area about 1030 km (640 miles) from left to right. North is about the 1:30 position. Numerous volcanic calderas and lava flows are visible here. The brown teardrop-shaped feature at left center is Galai Patera, a 100-km-long (62 mi) lava-flooded caldera (collapsed vent) of a volcano. The composition of Io's volcanic plains and lava flows has not been determined...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Io
Downloads: 5
[image]Io with Loki Plume on Bright Limb - NASA
Voyager 1 image of Io showing active plume of Loki on limb. Heart-shaped feature southeast of Loki consists of fallout deposits from active plume Pele. The images that make up this mosaic were taken from an average distance of approximately 490,000 kilometers (340,000 miles).
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Io
Downloads: 5
[image]Io, the Ra Patera, Mazda Catena, and Gibil Patera Area - NASA
Io's volcanic plains are shown in this Voyager 1 image mosaic. Also visible are numerous volcanic calderas and lava flows. Ra Patera with its multihued lava flows is below and right of the mosaic's center. This scene is about 1300 miles (2100 km) long. The composition of Io's volcanic plains and lava flows has not been determined, but they could consist dominantly of sulfur or of silicates (such as basalt) coated with sulfur condensates...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Io
Downloads: 5
[image]Io - NASA
This Voyager 2 picture of Io was taken in ultraviolet light on the evening of July 4, 1979, at a range of 4.7 million kilometers (2.9 million miles). The bright spot on the right limb is one of the volcanic eruption plumes first photographed by Voyager 1. The plume is more than 200 kilometers (124 miles) high. The volcano apparently has been erupting since it was observed by Voyager 1 in March. This suggests that the volcanos on Io probably are in continuous eruption.
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Io
Downloads: 5
[image]Callisto - NASA
This black and white image of Callisto was taken by Voyager 2 about 3:20 A.M PDT Saturday, July 7, from a range of about 1.1 million kilometers (675,000 miles). The picture has been enhanced to reveal detail in the scene. Voyager l's high resolution coverage was of the hemisphere just over the right-hand (eastern) horizon, and the large ring structure discovered by Voyager 1 is just over the eastern limb...
Keywords: What -- Callisto; What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 12
[image]Callisto Mosaic - NASA
Callisto was revealed by the Voyager cameras to be a heavily cratered and hence geologically inactive world. This mosaic of Voyager 1 images, obtained on March 6 from a distance of about 400,000 kilometers, shows surface detail as small as 10 kilometers across. The prominent old impact feature Valhalla has a central bright spot about 600 kilometers across, probably representing the original impact basin...
Keywords: What -- Callisto; What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 11
[image]Io, Showing Volcanic Plains and Mountains - NASA
Io's volcanic plains are shown in this Voyager 1 image. Also visible are numerous volcanic calderas and two large mountains (Euboea Montes, just above center, and Haemus Montes, at lower left). The plains include some distinct lava flows, such as those of Lerna Regio (lower right), and low mesas, such as Nemeas Planum (bottom center) and Dodona Planum (just left of center). This scene is about 1050 mi (1700 km) from left to right...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Io
Downloads: 7
[image]Ganymede - NASA
This Voyager 2 color photo of Ganymede, the largest Galilean satellite, was taken on July 7, 1979, from a range of 1.2 million kilometers. Most of this portion of Ganymede will be imaged at high resolution during closest approach with the satellite on the evening of July 8, 1979. The photo shows a large dark circular feature about 3200 kilometers in diameter with narrow closely-spaced light bands traversing its surface...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Ganymede
Downloads: 17
[image]Io - One of at Least Four Simultaneous Erupting Volcanic Eruptions - NASA
This photo of an active volcanic eruption on Jupiter's satellite Io was taken 1 hour, 52 minutes after the accompanying picture, late in the evening of March 4, 1979, Pacific time. On the limb of the satellite can be seen one of at least four simultaneous volcanic eruptions -- the first such activity ever observed on another celestial body. Seen against the limb are plume-like structures rising more than 60 miles (100 kilometers) above the surface...
Keywords: What -- Io; What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 7
[image]Io - NASA
This Voyager 1 view of an equatorial region near longitude 300 degrees shows several large surface flows that originate in volcanic craters or calderas. At the right edge is a light flow about 250 kilometers long. Another dark, lobate flow with bright edges is just left of center, with an exceedingly dark caldera to its left.
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Io
Downloads: 7
[image]Io 2x2 Mosaic - NASA
Perhaps the most spectacular of all the Voyager photos of Io is this mosaic obtained by Voyager 1 on March 5 at a range of 400,000 kilometers. A great variety of color and albedo is seen on the surface, now thought to be the result of surface deposits of various forms of sulfur and sulfur dioxide. The two great volcanoes Pele and Loki (upper left) are prominent.
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Io
Downloads: 34
[image]Mosaic of Saturn's rings - NASA
This detailed mosaic of the underside of the Cassini Division was obtained by Voyager 1 with a resolution of about 10 kilometers. The classical Cassini Division appears here to the right of center as five bright rings with substantial blacks gap on either side. The inner edge of the A Ring, to the left of center, is the brightest part of this image. The fine-scale wave structure in this region has been interpreted as being the result of gravitational density waves.
Keywords: What -- Cassini; What -- Voyager 1
Downloads: 132
[image]Io Shown in Lambertian Equal Area Projection and in Approximately Natural Color - NASA
Voyager 1 computer color mosaics, shown in approximately natural color and in Lambertian equal-area projections, show the Eastern (left) and Western (right) hemispheres of Io. This innermost of Jupiter's 4 major satellites is the most volcanically active object in the solar system. Io is 2263 mi (3640 km) in diameter, making it a little bigger than Earth's moon. Almost all the features visible here have volcanic origins, including several calderas and eruption plumes that were active at the time...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Io; What -- Moon
Downloads: 9
[image]Callisto Hemispherical Globes - NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA-JPL)
The images used for the base of this globe were chosen from the best image quality and moderate resolution coverage supplied by Galileo SSI and Voyager 1 and 2 (Batson, 1987; Becker and others, 1998; Becker and others, 1999; Becker and others, 2001). The digital map was produced using Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS) (Eliason, 1997; Gaddis and others, 1997; Torson and Becker, 1997)...
Keywords: What -- Galileo; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Callisto
Downloads: 12
[image]Io At 5 Million Miles - NASA
This photo of Jupiter's satellite Io was taken by Voyager 1 about 4:30 p.m. (PST) March 2, 1979. The spacecraft was about 5 million miles (8.3 million kilometers away). Voyager 1 was mapping Jupiter with the cameras and infrared instrument at the time the picture was taken. The hemisphere seen here is the one that always faces away from Jupiter. This photo shows details on Io never before seen. The smallest features are about 38 miles (70 kilometers) across...
Keywords: What -- Io; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Jupiter
Downloads: 7
[image]Io Surface Deposits and Volcano - NASA
This color picture of Io, Jupiter's innermost Galilean satellite, was taken by Voyager 1 on the morning of March 5, 1979 at a range of 128,500 kilometers (77,100 miles). It is centered at 8 south latitude and 317 longitude. The width of the picture is about 1000 kilometers (600 miles). The diffuse reddish and orangish colorations are probably surface deposits of sulfur compounds, salts and possibly other volcanic sublimates...
Keywords: What -- Io; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Crater
Downloads: 8
[image]Saturn's ring system - NASA
Both the limb of Saturn and the shadow of its ring system are seen through the transparent C-ring in this striking picture taken by NASA's Voyager 1 on Nov. 9, 1980 at a distance of 4.5 million kilometers (3 million miles). Gaps and regions of high transparency are seen throughout the C-ring, especially in the area closest to the opaque B-ring. Shadows of the A-, B-, and C-rings are clearly visible on the disk of Saturn...
Keywords: What -- Saturn; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Cassini
Downloads: 8
[image]Europa Hemispherical Globes - NASA
The images used for the base of this globe were chosen from coverage supplied by the Galileo solid-state imaging (SSI) camera and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. The individual images were radiometrically calibrated and photometrically normalized using a Lunar-Lambert function with empirically derived values. A linear correction based on the statistics of all overlapping areas was then applied to minimize image brightness variations...
Keywords: What -- Galileo; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Europa
Downloads: 8
[image]Voyager Approaches Final Frontier - NASA/JPL/Walt Feimer
An artist's concept illustrates the positions of the Voyager spacecraft in relation to structures formed around our Sun by the solar wind. Also illustrated is the termination shock, a violent region the spacecraft must pass through before reaching the outer limits of the solar system. At the termination shock, the supersonic solar wind abruptly slows from an average speed of 400 kilometers per second to less than 100 kilometer per second (900,000 to less than 225,000 miles per hour)...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Sun; What -- Voyager
Downloads: 16
[image]Lights In The Night - NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA-JPL)
LIGHTS IN THE NIGHT ON JUPITER: This Voyager 1 image was taken of Jupiter's darkside on March 5, 1979. The picture is a 3 minute, 12 second exposure by the wide angle camera taken when the spacecraft was in Jupiter's shadow, about 6 hours after closest approach to the planet at a distance of 320,000 miles. Jupiter's north pole is on the limb toward the upper center. The long bright double streak is an aurora on Jupiter's limb near its north pole...
Keywords: What -- Jupiter; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Earth
Downloads: 10
[image]Lights In The Night - NASA
LIGHTS IN THE NIGHT ON JUPITER: This Voyager 1 image was taken of Jupiter's darkside on March 5, 1979. The picture is a 3 minute, 12 second exposure by the wide angle camera taken when the spacecraft was in Jupiter's shadow, about 6 hours after closest approach to the planet at a distance of 320,000 miles. Jupiter's north pole is on the limb toward the upper center. The long bright double streak is an aurora on Jupiter's limb near its north pole...
Keywords: What -- Jupiter; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Earth
Downloads: 10
[image]Solar System Portrait - Earth - NASA
This image of the Earth is one of 60 frames taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft on Feb. 14, 1990 from a distance of approximately 4 billion miles and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic plane. This image the Earth is a mere point of light, a crescent only 0.12 pixel in size. Our planet was caught in the center of one of the scattered light rays resulting from taking the image so close to the sun.
Keywords: What -- Earth; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Sun
Downloads: 9
[image]Europa Hemispherical Globes - NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA-JPL)
The images used for the base of this globe were chosen from coverage supplied by the Galileo solid-state imaging (SSI) camera and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. The individual images were radiometrically calibrated and photometrically normalized using a Lunar-Lambert function with empirically derived values. A linear correction based on the statistics of all overlapping areas was then applied to minimize image brightness variations...
Keywords: What -- Galileo; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Europa
Downloads: 10
[image]Solar System Portrait - Earth as 'Pale Blue Dot - NASA
This narrow-angle color image of the Earth, dubbed 'Pale Blue Dot', is a part of the first ever 'portrait' of the solar system taken by Voyager 1. The spacecraft acquired a total of 60 frames for a mosaic of the solar system from a distance of more than 4 billion miles from Earth and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic. From Voyager's great distance Earth is a mere point of light, less than the size of a picture element even in the narrow-angle camera...
Keywords: What -- Earth; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Sun
Downloads: 54
[image]Voyager Approaches Final Frontier - NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA-JPL)
An artist's concept illustrates the positions of the Voyager spacecraft in relation to structures formed around our Sun by the solar wind. Also illustrated is the termination shock, a violent region the spacecraft must pass through before reaching the outer limits of the solar system. At the termination shock, the supersonic solar wind abruptly slows from an average speed of 400 kilometers per second to less than 100 kilometer per second (900,000 to less than 225,000 miles per hour)...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Sun; What -- Voyager
Downloads: 10
[image]Callisto Hemispherical Globes - NASA
The images used for the base of this globe were chosen from the best image quality and moderate resolution coverage supplied by Galileo SSI and Voyager 1 and 2 (Batson, 1987; Becker and others, 1998; Becker and others, 1999; Becker and others, 2001). The digital map was produced using Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS) (Eliason, 1997; Gaddis and others, 1997; Torson and Becker, 1997)...
Keywords: What -- Galileo; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Callisto
Downloads: 10
[image]A79-7073 - NASA/Ames Research Center
Photographer: JPL P-21738 BW Raange: 4.76 million kilometers (2.9 million miles) This Voyager 2 picture of Io was taken in ultraviolet light and shows one of the volcanic eruption plumes first photographed by Voyager 1. (the bright spot on the right limb) The plume is more than 200 kilometers (124 miles) high. The volcano apparently has been erupting since it was observed by Voyager 1 in March, 1979...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Io; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
Downloads: 19
[image]Saturn's A-ring - NASA
Voyager 2 cameras acquired this photograph of Saturn's A-ring Aug. 26 from a distance of 227,800 kilometers (141,500 miles). This view of the ring's outer edge shows a small bright, clumpy ring within the Encke Gap (center of this image) that exhibits kinks reminiscent of those observed in the F-ring by Voyager 1 last fall but not by Voyager 2. Voyager 1 saw two similar clumpy rings in this region at much lower resolution...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Voyager; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
Downloads: 6
[image]A79-7108 - NASA/Ames Research Center
Photographer : JPL Range : 1.5 million km ( 930,000 miles ) This high resolution view of Jupitor's ring, part of a set obtained by Voyager 2 (A79-7101), suggests that it may be divided into several components, as are the rings of Saturn. The ring was unexpectedly bright, due to forward scattering of sunlight by small ring particles. The rings were discovered 4 months ago by Voyager 1. The "V" shaped figure to the left is caused by a star image which was trailed out as the camera moved slightly d...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Saturn; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
Downloads: 13
[image]A79-7119 - NASA/Ames Research Center
Photograph by JPL Voyager 1 views of Jupiter's rings
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
Downloads: 7
[image]Launch of Titan III-Centaur, Voyager 1 - NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
The Voyager 1 aboard the Titan III/Centaur lifted off on September 5, 1977, joining its sister spacecraft, the Voyager 2, on a mission to the outer planets.
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Titan; What -- Voyager 2; What -- Centaur
Downloads: 36
[image]KSC-77PP-229 - NASA
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Voyager-1 spacecraft was reencapsulated within its payload in Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-1 today. The spacecraft is to be mated with Titan/Centaur-6 at Launch Complex 41 later this week. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Sept. 5.
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; Where -- Kennedy Space Center (KSC)
Downloads: 11
[image]A79-7120 - NASA/Ames Research Center
Photographer: Voyager 1 spacecraft Jupiter moon Ganymede
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Jupiter; What -- Moon; What -- Ganymede
Downloads: 14
[image]AC80-7007 - NASA/Ames Research Center
Photographer : JPL Range : 12 million km. ( 7.56 million miles) P-23057C & BW This Voyager 1 photograph of Titan, the largest of Saturn's 14 known satellites, shows little more than the upper layers of clouds covering the moon. The orange colored haze, is believed to be composed of photochemically produced hydrocarbons, hides Titan's solid surface from Voyager's camera. Some weak shadings in the clouds are becoming visible...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Moon; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
Downloads: 5
[image]A79-7086 - NASA/Ames Research Center
Photographer: JPL P-21757 BW Range: 2 million kilometers (1.25 million miles) Jupiter's thin ring of particles was photographed by Voyager 2 on its approach to the giant planet. The spacecraft was 2.5 _ above the plane of the ring. Segments of both sides of the faint ring were captured in this picture. The ring was first photographed in an edge-on configuration by Voyager 1 and was measured then to have a radial extent of about 55, 000 kilometers (34,000 miles) from Jupiter's cloud tops...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Saturn; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
Downloads: 7
[image]AC79-7009 - NASA/Ames Research Center
Photographer: JPL Jupiter as seen by Voyager 1, mosaic of planet. (JPL ref. No. P-21147)
Keywords: What -- Jupiter; What -- Voyager 1; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
Downloads: 11
[image]AC79-7012 - NASA/Ames Research Center
Photographer: JPL Jupiter as seen by Voyager 1, mosic of Great Red Spot. (JPL ref. No. P-21203)
Keywords: What -- Jupiter; What -- Voyager 1; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
Downloads: 12
[image]Io - crescent with plumes - NASA
Voyager 2 took this picture of Io July 10, 1979, from a range of 1.2 million kilometers (750,000 miles). It was one of the last of an extensive sequence of "volcano watch" pictures planned as a time lapse study of the nearest of Jupiter's Galilean satellites. The sunlit crescent of Io is seen at the left, and the night side illuminated by light reflected from Jupiter can also be seen. Three volcanic eruption plumes are visible on the limb...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Io; What -- Jupiter; What -- Voyager
Downloads: 6
[image]Jupiter's moon Io - NASA
This picture shows a special color reconstruction of one of the erupting volcanos on Io discovered by Voyager 1 during its encounter with Jupiter on the 4th and 5th of March. The picture was taken March 4 about 5:00 p.m. from a range of about half a million kilometers showing an eruption region on the horizon. This method of color analysis allows scientists to combine data from four pictures, taken in ultraviolet, blue, green and orange light...
Keywords: What -- Io; What -- Voyager 1; What -- Jupiter; What -- Moon
Downloads: 11
[image]A79-7109 - NASA/Ames Research Center
Photographer : JPL Range : 1.5 million km ( 930,000 miles ) This high resolution view of Jupitor's ring, part of a set obtained by Voyager 2 (A79-7101), suggests that it may be divided into several components, as are the rings of Saturn. Seen within the inner edge of the brighter ring is a fainter ring, which may extend all the way down to Jupiter's cloud tops. The ring was unexpectedly bright, due to forward scattering of sunlight by small ring particles...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Saturn; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
Downloads: 10
[image]Disturbed Region West of the Great Red Spot - NASA
This photo from Voyager 2 was taken on June 9, 1979 and is centered over the long-lived disturbed region west of the Great Red Spot (GRS). Note that the White Oval to the lower left of the GRS has a similar chaotic region of clouds to its west. This particular White Oval, which is not the same one as that seen below the GRS by Voyager 1 in March, 1979, is moving to the right relative to the Red Spot...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Voyager 2; What -- Jupiter
Downloads: 9
[image]Io - NASA
Voyager 2 took this picture of Io on the evening of July 9, 1979, from a range of 1.2 million kilometers. On the limb of Io are two blue volcanic eruption plumes about 100 kilometers high. These two plumes were first seen by Voyager 1 in March, 1979, and are designated Plume 5 (upper) and Plume 6 (lower). They have apparently been erupting for a period of at least 4 months and probably longer. A total of six plumes have been seen by Voyager 2, all of which were first seen by Voyager 1...
Keywords: What -- Voyager 1; What -- Io; What -- Voyager 2
Downloads: 12
[1] 2 3 4 5 6 7     Next    Last
Advanced search

Group results by:

> Relevance
Mediatype
Collection

Related mediatypes

image
movies